Your challenge, if you choose to accept…

On FinerMinds for the next 30 days, we’ll be running a special challenge that will expand your mind in ways you’ve probably always hoped you could, but have just never had the time.

In short, Brian Johnson, has re-released his famous Philosophers Notes.

And while we think Brian is a genius in his own right, these “notes” are actually a summary of some of the greatest personal development and business books in history.

So to give you a little taste of these famous “notes”, we want to invite you to join the Philosophers Notes Challenge, where each day for the next 30 days, Brian will be releasing a new video discussing a different book from his Philosophers Notes collection.

The idea is to get your mind flowing with new juicy insights, and you chatting with like-minded people about your thoughts… regardless of how philosophical they may be… (no judgment, we promise!).

And to kick-start the challenge, today we’ll be studying the famed and highly talked about book: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey.

Here’s one of our favorite quotes from the book:

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People“I believe that a life of integrity is the most fundamental source of personal worth. I do not agree with the popular success literature that says that self-esteem is primarily a matter of mind set, of attitude — that you can psych yourself into peace of mind. Peace of mind comes when your life is in harmony with true principles and values and in no other way.” – Stephen R. Covey from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

To take part in the challenge, simply watch the 10-minute video above where Brian discusses his insights from the book, and then tell us the #1 thing you’ve learned from today’s challenge below.

 

Join the discussion 677 Comments

  • Avatar craigab1 says:

    If you are more than 25-years-old and you haven't made the time to read "The 7 Habits," what's wrong with you? This is only the #1 Most Influential Business Book of the Twentieth Century, with more than 15 million copies sold!

    If you haven't read it, the habits are: 1) Be Proactive; 2) Begin With the End in Mind; 3) Put First Things First; 4) Think Win/Win; 5) Seek First to Understand; 6) Synergy; and 7) Sharpen the Saw.

    As with yesterday's selection, "The Four Agreements," rather than go into detail about what each of those means, I'm going to focus on a couple of the Disruptive Thoughts that struck me as I listened, read, and considered Brian Johnson's PhilosophersNotes summary. With this book especially, however, I can't help but share the ways in which my life has changed as a result of reading Covey's masterpiece more than 15 years ago.

    It was 1994 and I was fortunate enough to be selected to participate in Youth Service America's New Generation Training Program (NGTP). I lived in Washington, DC then, as now, but the three sessions of my class met in San Francisco. It was one of those opportunities that was useful in the moment, but whose powerful impact really only became clear years later. Among many incredible experiences that year, was the chance to read, study, and use Covey's book as a framework for our personal and professional growth and development. NGTP gave all of us so much and asked only a couple of things in return.

    One of things we promised was to create our own personal mission statement and to review and reflect on it once a year for the rest of our lives. In the social profit sector we are all familiar with organizational mission statements. The personal version has the same intent: to define your core values and help you achieve your dreams. This is a cornerstone of Covey's teaching.

    At the beginning of every new year, I review my statement, evaluating my actions against what I know to be important to me. It gets me back on track, if I've drifted. A couple of times I've made changes to my statement, but they have always been minor and usually reflected newly discovered passions or powerful new dreams. I've created a workshop from this process and used it with groups of young people all around the world. I hope after reading my mission, you'll take the time to create your own. Tell your life story. Act boldly to achieve your dreams.

    My mission statement begins like this:

    To love often and much—people and ideas and life itself;
    To take risks every day which challenge me to face my fears;
    To see my dreams as the foundation of my future, and my passions as mortar for the bricks;
    To remember that only I am me, that I am special, and that others are too;
    To learn and grow each day from every moment and every experience . . .

    Whenever I share my mission with others, it helps keep me on track. Feel free to read my whole statement here: Craig's Life & Love.pdf

    Craig's Life & Love.pdf Honestly, with "The 7 Habits," I could probably write for hours about all of the ways my life has changed by embracing the ideas Covey explains. I really hope you'll read it for the first time, or read it again. Let me leave you with a couple of great quotes that capture some of that wisdom.

    First, Oliver Wendell Holmes reminds us that “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

    And one of my favorites from E.B. White: “I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes, this makes planning the day difficult.” Makes you smile, right?!

    • Avatar David says:

      I haven't read it. I am not that interested in "Business". Now I don't have to read it because Brian has provided the big ideas in this workshop. I admit that if I had read this before I was 25, things might have worked out differently for me. But at my funeral, I would rather be remembered as fun-loving and serendipitous than always striving for money and business related goals, no matter how well or successfully I acheived them.

      • Avatar roynaim says:

        I agree with you about being fun loving and all and it is not about making money. Business is not about making money. At least that is what I try to be. To me business is about passion and about doing the things I love. The things that excites me. Things that make me want to talk about it all day long. I personally enjoy building businesses because that is fun to me. Sure I enjoy the money but through my building businesses I am leaving a legacy of a person who loves CREATING and not destroying.

        • Avatar David says:

          Kudos. Especially to the enlightened business person. I certainly am not against business. We, as a society, could not exist as we are without the entrepreneurs and the driving force of the creative, productive, people who run businesses. I certainly would not be living as well as I do if not for them. I am sadly forced to admit that man can never return to the "Hunter Gatherer" society, or the agrarian ideal, because of the needs of our current society and it's population. I guess I should just get on-board and stop wishing for things that will never happen.

    • Avatar Myles says:

      "To see my dreams as the foundation of my future, and my passions as mortar for the bricks"

      :)

  • Avatar Craig Bowman says:

    If you are more than 25-years-old and you haven't made the time to read “The 7 Habits,” what's wrong with you? This is only the #1 Most Influential Business Book of the Twentieth Century, with more than 15 million copies sold!

    If you haven't read it, the habits are: 1) Be Proactive; 2) Begin With the End in Mind; 3) Put First Things First; 4) Think Win/Win; 5) Seek First to Understand; 6) Synergy; and 7) Sharpen the Saw.

    As with yesterday's selection, “The Four Agreements,” rather than go into detail about what each of those means, I'm going to focus on a couple of the Disruptive Thoughts that struck me as I listened, read, and considered Brian Johnson's PhilosophersNotes summary. With this book especially, however, I can't help but share the ways in which my life has changed as a result of reading Covey's masterpiece more than 15 years ago.

    It was 1994 and I was fortunate enough to be selected to participate in Youth Service America's New Generation Training Program (NGTP). I lived in Washington, DC then, as now, but the three sessions of my class met in San Francisco. It was one of those opportunities that was useful in the moment, but whose powerful impact really only became clear years later. Among many incredible experiences that year, was the chance to read, study, and use Covey's book as a framework for our personal and professional growth and development. NGTP gave all of us so much and asked only a couple of things in return.

    One of things we promised was to create our own personal mission statement and to review and reflect on it once a year for the rest of our lives. In the social profit sector we are all familiar with organizational mission statements. The personal version has the same intent: to define your core values and help you achieve your dreams. This is a cornerstone of Covey's teaching.

    At the beginning of every new year, I review my statement, evaluating my actions against what I know to be important to me. It gets me back on track, if I've drifted. A couple of times I've made changes to my statement, but they have always been minor and usually reflected newly discovered passions or powerful new dreams. I've created a workshop from this process and used it with groups of young people all around the world. I hope after reading my mission, you'll take the time to create your own. Tell your life story. Act boldly to achieve your dreams.

    My mission statement begins like this:

    To love often and much—people and ideas and life itself;
    To take risks every day which challenge me to face my fears;
    To see my dreams as the foundation of my future, and my passions as mortar for the bricks;
    To remember that only I am me, that I am special, and that others are too;
    To learn and grow each day from every moment and every experience . . .

    Whenever I share my mission with others, it helps keep me on track. Feel free to read my whole statement here: Craig's Life & Love.pdf

    Craig's Life & Love.pdf Honestly, with “The 7 Habits,” I could probably write for hours about all of the ways my life has changed by embracing the ideas Covey explains. I really hope you'll read it for the first time, or read it again. Let me leave you with a couple of great quotes that capture some of that wisdom.

    First, Oliver Wendell Holmes reminds us that “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

    And one of my favorites from E.B. White: “I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes, this makes planning the day difficult.” Makes you smile, right?!

  • Avatar julieanne says:

    I thought we were still on Day 1. Loved The Four Agreements and was amazed as my day progressed how many times I caught myself "caring what other people think" and was able to turn it around and remind myself to refrain from taking anything personally.
    It's true that it takes a strong will to fully adopt these agreements.
    I like these quotes: "when you are impeccable,you take responsibility for your actions, but do not judge or blame yourself", and "Nothing other people do is because of you. It is because of themselves". Looking forward to Day 2!

    • Avatar MarkHoover says:

      Yes, Julieanne, I was tempted to dive into #2 tonight. I feel I have to stick with my program and hold to my commitment so I'm waiting 'til the morning to immerse in the second day. Ain't nothing gonna break my stride! I can see how this early posting can be beneficial for our buddies in Oz, though. Rock on, down under!

      Really…releasing yourself from others' opinions makes a wonderful difference, doesn't it? I felt like I was on cloud 9 all day, particularly in two instances back-to-back. I felt FREE!

      ~ Mark

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      beautiful,julieanna!

      LOVE this: "when you are impeccable,you take responsibility for your actions, but do not judge or blame yourself"

      fun! :)

  • Avatar julieanne says:

    I thought we were still on Day 1. Loved The Four Agreements and was amazed as my day progressed how many times I caught myself “caring what other people think” and was able to turn it around and remind myself to refrain from taking anything personally.
    It's true that it takes a strong will to fully adopt these agreements.
    I like these quotes: “when you are impeccable,you take responsibility for your actions, but do not judge or blame yourself”, and “Nothing other people do is because of you. It is because of themselves”. Looking forward to Day 2!

  • Avatar René Otero says:

    Know this book well. Nice to listen to your Note on this on Brian! This time I really responded to the Quadrant 2 imperative and the idea about Synergy. As a bassist, I can tell you I am NOTHING without one of my amazing drummer friends. With one of them by my side I can make you dance, open your heart, or kick you in the gut with power. ;)

    The Quadrant 2 imperative is really what embracing this challenge is all about. Thanks to all who worked so hard to put this together so that all of us can spend fifty non-urgent and deeply important days together in Quadrant 2!

    My 5 year-old son is fortunate enough to attend a school that uses the 7 Habits for Kids as their core foundation and participates in research with the Coveys. He knows and applies the habits in kindergarten! The other day I said "no" to one of his requests and he said "But Papi, I'm synergyzing." And he was!

    • Avatar bluejules says:

      Wow! This is really interesting – wherabouts are you? I work in education here in the UK and can only begin to imagine the impact of schools using the 7 habits for kids as their core foundation! Here in the UK personal development in schools has taken on much more importance over the last 5 years or so, but I have never been convinced that we are going about this in the right way, sometimes dealing with the symptom (eg, having classes for anger management for kids) rather than looking at the cause and instilling all the good stuff from the word go. At the moment my aim is to work with teachers and support staff on all this – I think that's a good place to start!

      • Avatar René Otero says:

        I hope so Lincolsmom!

        Hi Jules! We live in the Orlando, FL area. This school is, unfortunately, still the exception rather than the rule, but I love the results I see. The county I live in has a Leadership track that goes from elementary through high school in this particular zone. The kids learn these principles in K and expand on them throughout their 12 years. School management is handled using the Covey terminology explicitly. I posted links below to the book the kids are exposed to as well as the recent book from Steven Covey about this school initiative. My son's school is one of the schools featured in the book. This has been an unexpected blessing, since this just happens to be the school four blocks from our home!

        I have been in education myself for about ten years. Mostly high school and now university. I'm sure I don't need to tell you how much these skills are needed early in life! ;)

        Thanks for the reply! Now off to get this kiddo to school!

        http://www.amazon.com/Leader-Me-Schools-Inspiring

        http://www.amazon.com/7-Habits-Happy-Kids/dp/1416

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      that bassist/synergy story gives me goosebumps, René!

      and YES!! special shout outs and thx to the incredibly inspired and inspiring and hard working finer minds/mind valley crew for making this happen and making it look so easy! :)

      and OMG too cool on your son! heheheheh and yayuh! give him a high five for me, please. :)

      "But Papi, I'm synergyzing."

      still smiling… :)

  • Avatar René Ot says:

    Know this book well. Nice to listen to your Note on this on Brian! This time I really responded to the Quadrant 2 imperative and the idea about Synergy. As a bassist, I can tell you I am NOTHING without one of my amazing drummer friends. With one of them by my side I can make you dance, open your heart, or kick you in the gut with power. ;)

    The Quadrant 2 imperative is really what embracing this challenge is all about. Thanks to all who worked so hard to put this together so that all of us can spend fifty non-urgent and deeply important days together in Quadrant 2!

    My 5 year-old son is fortunate enough to attend a school that uses the 7 Habits for Kids as their core foundation and participates in research with the Coveys. He knows and applies the habits in kindergarten! The other day I said “no” to one of his requests and he said “But Papi, I'm synergyzing.” And he was!

  • Avatar Kauser Huq says:

    DAY 2 The seven habits of highly effective people by Stephen Covey

    I read this book about 7 years back , the first self development book I had ever read. At that time the impact was different as I read it from a very different stand point. Today, I really really understand what this great man has been talking about all these years….and today is the first day that I really understand the Time management module…the synergy part is something that has motivated me to work with others at work and not try to do everything myself…..a lot of deep stuff Brian, even in the six pages of the PDF File, I would have to listen to this one at least two more times to grasp what you have communicated….lots of things to do in this as well….so I’d better get going doing them

  • Avatar Kavalloore Muraleedh says:

    Dr. Covey leads us to visions and missions of truthful life. Peace of mind comes with true principles and values. Peace of mind – the great wealth of life, achieving being proactive and responsible. Integrity and commitments bringing joy and happiness. Creations of life, mental and physical, prioritizing things with urgency and result, with effectively and efficiently, with set roles and goals with a sharpened saw, we discover our life!! Great ideas to implement in everyday life! Thank you Brian & Vishen for bringing these ideas into my life.

  • Avatar Rob_MacLuan says:

    One of the first books I really DUG into time and again. Every habit is a gem, and worth meditating upon. Still thinking about yesterdays book and how much time I spend thinking about "the good opinion of others".

  • Avatar Rob_MacLuan says:

    One of the first books I really DUG into time and again. Every habit is a gem, and worth meditating upon. Still thinking about yesterdays book and how much time I spend thinking about “the good opinion of others”.

  • Avatar Lincolnsmom says:

    Your son is going to make an amazing adult 1 day!

  • Avatar Kim says:

    What a timely note! As I was listening on my way to work, I realized that the stress management workshop I am leading this morning is based loosly on many of the 7 Habits.

    Terrific! A wonderful affirmation that even if we forget the details (I completely did not remember anything except that I read the book years ago), if we internalize the content it stays with us forever!

  • Avatar davybuoy says:

    It's a great book, all of it very useful. But I am coming around to the importance of habit 2 and inparticular the section of the note entitled "Planting Priorities". Without priorities clearly developed and planted deeply in your heart and mind, you expend too much energy directing and motivating yourself to be truly effective.

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      hey davy: that one is one of my absolute FAVORITE ideas. I didn't take the time to go off on it in this show b/c, well, there's only so much you can do in 10 minutes, but seeing the importance of deeply planted priorities vis-a-vis discipline has been a huge theme of my life over the last several months and something i'll be talking about a lot more!

      thx for sharing!

    • Avatar katrinaT says:

      So true. Its one thing to have a thought about what you want. But to "plant it" (wow, I love that term) is what brings it from your thoughts into the earth. Into your body. And you can't be as effective if you're not clear about what you're working for. A person can stay in their heads forever about their dreams. It becomes a habit. It takes a lot of effort to focus on exactly what you want, plan how to get it and follow it through. It takes a real love and trust in one's self.

  • Avatar davybuoy says:

    It's a great book, all of it very useful. But I am coming around to the importance of habit 2 and inparticular the section of the note entitled “Planting Priorities”. Without priorities clearly developed and planted deeply in your heart and mind, you expend too much energy directing and motivating yourself to be truly effective.

  • Avatar JKatzer says:

    You're going to be just fine – the mere fact that you are so honest and being so open with where you are at and your commitment to the effort of change makes it a done deal… ; )

  • @Brian: Today I’ve studied the notes on “The Diamond Cutter” and “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”. Thanks for the tip.
    Keeping a “Six-Time Book” journal is a great way to work on vague habits like “Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood”. I’m going to implement keeping a “Six-Time Book” journal starting from next week. When can you make that video on how you personally use this Six-Time Book? :)

    TIP for the readers: Here is a great link I've found on how to start using the “Six-Time Book” journal. Check it out:
    http://diamondcuttergroups.com/resources/six-time

    • Avatar MaxineH says:

      Thanks for sharing this. I listened to the note a while ago, (I don't think it's part of the 50 day challenge) and while the idea of the 6 time book, sounded great, I couldn't quite picture how it worked. I followed your link, and now it makes more sense. Will add that to my to do list.

      One thought, why wait till next week to start your journal, Brian's always saying we should do it now :-)

    • Avatar Tom Carroll says:

      Peter, thanks for the link on using the "Six-Time Book" journal; seems like a simple, practical tool for mindful integration of principles. I'm going to follow your lead and use this approach for integrating some of the core principles from the 50-Day Challenge.

      This approach reminds me of Benjamin Franklin's original 13 virtues journal/charts with some added all-important specificity. I find it fascinating that Franklin's virtues journal was one of Hyrum W. Smith's inspirations for his day planner, which was the one that eventually was paired with The 7 Habits material and became the FranklinCovey Day Planner.

      • Avatar marilnjaye says:

        Yes! Ben Franklin's virtues chart was so important to me. I was first exposed to it about twenty years ago and it helped me make some very significant changes in how I used my mind. It was my first exposure to implementing the idea of the power of thoughts.

      • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

        exactly what i thought when i read it, tom! so cool. :)

      • @Tom: Thanks for the message (and the e-mail).
        Tell me more about how to implement "Benjamin Franklin's 13 virtues journal/charts". How does it work exactly? Where can I implement it?

        • Avatar Tom Carroll says:

          To me, the "Six-Time Book" represents an evolved middle way between Franklin's virtue chart (minimalist) and the FranklinCovey Day Planner (detailed). Here's Ben Franklin's description of the charting technique from his autobiography: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/preservation/bi… I used the Day Planner for years and found it less useful as my computer/PDA team calendar use increased. I discovered that it was taking too much time to manage my time management systems!

          Lately I've been using index cards with principles/commitments written on them that I carry in my pocket and review periodically during the day. What appeals to me about the Six-Time Book is its simplicity, portability, and promotion of balance (hit/miss the mark). It will bring a new level of balance and order to my card practice. Thanks to you and Brian and Peter for sharing! I also am looking forward to the goal monitoring product that the FinerMinds folks are working on. It would be cool to have a FinerMinds portal/aggregator that we could log into and monitor our goals, log our gratitude, and keep track of the products we purchased, etc. I'm just sayin' :-)

    • Avatar Deanne says:

      Hey Peter

      Thanks for putting this link in. It makes sense now… I'd like to say I'll use it but no, I wont. As a corollary to that though, I admire your commitment to have a go with the task. Love to hear how you go with it and if you get the results you are seeking.

      Cheers
      Deanne

    • Avatar ipurpose says:

      Hi Peter – Great link, thanks for sharing!

    • Avatar Linda_in_MI says:

      Thank you, Peter, for the "heads up" on The Diamond Cutter – – I see it is on the PN list, and now really look forward to that book in particular. I've copied out the instructions for the 6-time book and will be starting today!

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      peter: you rock! thx for sharing that link and connecting the diamond cutter to 7 habits. very cool.

      and smiling re: the 6-time book video. I think I'm gonna need to make it a practice of mine and get back in the groove on it then do the video!!! (I discarded my old journals , so can't flip back to show how i did it then! :)

  • @Brian: Today I’ve studied the notes on “The Diamond Cutter” and “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”. Thanks for the tip.
    Keeping a “Six-Time Book” journal is a great way to work on vague habits like “Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood”. I’m going to implement keeping a “Six-Time Book” journal starting from next week. When can you make that video on how you personally use this Six-Time Book? :)

    TIP for the readers: Here is a great link I've found on how to start using the “Six-Time Book” journal. Check it out:
    http://diamondcuttergroups.com/resources/six-time

    • Avatar Maxine says:

      Thanks for sharing this. I listened to the note a while ago, (I don't think it's part of the 50 day challenge) and while the idea of the 6 time book, sounded great, I couldn't quite picture how it worked. I followed your link, and now it makes more sense. Will add that to my to do list.

      One thought, why wait till next week to start your journal, Brian's always saying we should do it now :-)

      • @MaxineH: Nice. Keep me posted on how the “Six-Time Book” journal works out for you.
        The reason I wait to start with keeping “Six-Time Book” journal is because I've learned to be Proactive (Habit 1 of Covey). I've already have the major things planned out for this week. :)

    • Avatar Tom Carroll says:

      Peter, thanks for the link on using the “Six-Time Book” journal; seems like a simple, practical tool for mindful integration of principles. I'm going to follow your lead and use this approach for integrating some of the core principles from the 50-Day Challenge.

      This approach reminds me of Benjamin Franklin's original 13 virtues journal/charts with some added all-important specificity. I find it fascinating that Franklin's virtues journal was one of Hyrum W. Smith's inspirations for his day planner, which was the one that eventually was paired with The 7 Habits material and became the FranklinCovey Day Planner.

    • Avatar Deanne says:

      Hey Peter

      Thanks for putting this link in. It makes sense now… I'd like to say I'll use it but no, I wont. As a corollary to that though, I admire your commitment to have a go with the task. Love to hear how you go with it and if you get the results you are seeking.

      Cheers
      Deanne

    • Avatar Linda_in_MI says:

      Thank you, Peter, for the “heads up” on The Diamond Cutter – – I see it is on the PN list, and now really look forward to that book in particular. I've copied out the instructions for the 6-time book and will be starting today!

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      peter: you rock! thx for sharing that link and connecting the diamond cutter to 7 habits. very cool.

      and smiling re: the 6-time book video. I think I'm gonna need to make it a practice of mine and get back in the groove on it then do the video!!! (I discarded my old journals , so can't flip back to show how i did it then! :)

      • @Brian: You're welcome.
        Too bad you discarded your old journals. Would have been great to see how you use the technique in real life.
        I'll try to make a video on my experience on it, at the end of next week.

  • Avatar eubielicious says:

    This is another good note, Brian. I read this book many years ago, and don't have it now so can't refer to it, but the summary appears to do it justice.

    Nice that it dove-tails pretty well with yesterday's book 'The Four Agreements', for example 'Don't Make Assumptions' goes well with 'Seek to Understand then to be Understood'.

    I find the quadrant idea is one I remember most clearly from the book and it's the one idea that I've used most often in the meantime. I'm conscious that as I'm sometimes quite scatterbrained, I can get distracted and therefore spend time out of Quadrant II and instead in the dreaded Quadrant IV. Part of the difficulty there is that if I'm not clear on the outcome, it can be difficult to know the difference!

    Again, a great note and lots to think about…

    Euan

    • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

      right on, euan!

      and great connection btwn seeking first to understand and not making assumptions. i hadn't made that and love it!

      appreciate your comments and sending smiles and high fives!

      -bri

    • Avatar katrinaT says:

      Yes, I noticed that today's note coincides with the first. I would think, though, that there is a general sentiment with PN anyway. Transformation! From every angle. I'm just sitting here reading through the posts and my body is like, electric. Its just humming. The lessons I'm re-membering settling in. And its only day 2!

      I don't think I'm going to recognize myself at the end ot this.

  • Avatar eubielicious says:

    This is another good note, Brian. I read this book many years ago, and don't have it now so can't refer to it, but the summary appears to do it justice.

    Nice that it dove-tails pretty well with yesterday's book 'The Four Agreements', for example 'Don't Make Assumptions' goes well with 'Seek to Understand then to be Understood'.

    I find the quadrant idea is one I remember most clearly from the book and it's the one idea that I've used most often in the meantime. I'm conscious that as I'm sometimes quite scatterbrained, I can get distracted and therefore spend time out of Quadrant II and instead in the dreaded Quadrant IV. Part of the difficulty there is that if I'm not clear on the outcome, it can be difficult to know the difference!

    Again, a great note and lots to think about…

    Euan

  • Avatar bluejules says:

    I'm in the UK, so I the timing is working out well for me!
    The 7 Habits was the first 'personal development' book I read – about 9 years ago- and I have to admit that at the time, although I could see its brilliance, I didn't find it an 'easy read'. Seven habits seemed like quite a lot for the beginner to take in all at once! But it changed things for ever in more ways than one. Covey's 'principle centred' approach is pretty much timeless. The story about 'sharpening the saw' is one that never loses its power with me, and whenever I find myself too tired to invest time in really important stuff I remind myself of this.
    There's one quote in the book that, above all others, has stuck with me through some 'bad times'. It's something like 'Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.' This always makes me think about how important it is for me to have total control of that space between stimulus and response – because when I've lost that control, that's when less-than-good things have happened.
    The other way in which this changed my life was that when my (then) teenage daughter saw the 7 Habits book, she found another book, written by Covey's son, called 'The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens'. She lived by this book, and her optimism and positivity as a teenager was an absolute joy.

    • Avatar mamarevkk says:

      Thanks for sharing the Teen version! I didn't know it existed. While sharing the PN today with my 14YO, he responded with something like, "yeah, but teens don't care about spiritual stuff, they only care about whatever trauma and drama is going on in their life at the moment." Hmmm. I'll go pick up the 7 Habits for Teens today!

      • Avatar bluejules says:

        Cheers! I was just talking to my daughter about an hour ago – she is 21 now and has just become a mum. It was nice for her to reflect on how the book influenced her and really laid the foundations for her future. She bought it for all her friends as birthday presents! There's also a workbook, I think. All excellent stuff!

      • Avatar BrianJohnson says:

        hehehe. awesome!! :)

        made me think: we've got a high school teacher who's watching the PN TVs with his class during lunch!!!

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